Services and Counseling

Ways We Aid in Recovery

Services

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)
Intensive Outpatient
Mental Health Counseling
Substance Use Disorder Counseling
Group Counseling

Need Help?

Call or Message Us

(614) 710-1496

Open Hours

Monday – Wednesday:

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am – 6:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Sunday – Closed

Medication-Assisted Treatment Options

Opioid addiction is not a dead end. It may feel like it at times, and you may lose hope, but remember that you have options. Medication-assisted treatment for addiction can help you get on the right path and get your life back. There are two medications that are most often prescribed in the battle against addiction: buprenorphine and naltrexone.

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine was approved by the FDA for clinical use in 2002. It is classified as an opioid partial agonist. This means that it produces mild euphoria and respiratory depression. But the effects of buprenorphine are substantially weaker that those caused by heroin. Its effects level off at moderate doses, even without dosage increases. This “ceiling effect” lowers the risk of misuse and dependency.

Unlike methadone, which must be administered in a highly structured clinic, buprenorphine is the first medication to treat opioid dependency that is permitted to be prescribed or dispensed in physicians’ offices, significantly increasing treatment access. According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “medications such as buprenorphine, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of opioid dependency.”

Buprenorphine Side Effects

Talk to your doctor if you notice any of the following severe buprenorphine side effects:

  • Allergic reactions such as itching, hives, swelling, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Anxiety, restlessness, fast heartbeat, fever, sweating, muscle spasms
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there
  • Extreme dizziness or weakness, shallow breathing, slow or uneven heartbeat, sweating, seizures
  • Fast or slow pounding heartbeat
  • Lightheadedness
  • Severe constipation or stomach pain

Naltrexone

Naltrexone blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of opioids such as heroin. If the patient relapses and uses an opioid drug, naltrexone prevents the feeling of getting high. SAMHSA states: “As with all medications used in MAT, naltrexone is to be prescribed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling and participation in social support programs.”

Naltrexone Side Effects

If you have any of the following severe naltrexone side effects , contact your doctor:

  • Allergic reaction such as itching, hives, swelling, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Anxiety, confusion, depression, unusual thoughts or behaviors
  • Dark urine or pale stools
  • Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, stomach pain, or yellow skin or eyes
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Irritability
  • Massive increase in energy
  • Reckless behavior
Book an Appointment

Services

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)
Intensive Outpatient
Mental Health Counseling
Substance Use Disorder Counseling
Group Counseling

Medication-Assisted Treatment Options

Opioid addiction is not a dead end. It may feel like it at times, and you may lose hope, but remember that you have options. Medication-assisted treatment for addiction can help you get on the right path and get your life back. There are two medications that are most often prescribed in the battle against addiction: buprenorphine and naltrexone.

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine was approved by the FDA for clinical use in 2002. It is classified as an opioid partial agonist. This means that it produces mild euphoria and respiratory depression. But the effects of buprenorphine are substantially weaker that those caused by heroin. Its effects level off at moderate doses, even without dosage increases. This “ceiling effect” lowers the risk of misuse and dependency.

Unlike methadone, which must be administered in a highly structured clinic, buprenorphine is the first medication to treat opioid dependency that is permitted to be prescribed or dispensed in physicians’ offices, significantly increasing treatment access. According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “medications such as buprenorphine, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of opioid dependency.”

Buprenorphine Side Effects

Talk to your doctor if you notice any of the following severe buprenorphine side effects:

  • Allergic reactions such as itching, hives, swelling, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Anxiety, restlessness, fast heartbeat, fever, sweating, muscle spasms
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there
  • Extreme dizziness or weakness, shallow breathing, slow or uneven heartbeat, sweating, seizures
  • Fast or slow pounding heartbeat
  • Lightheadedness
  • Severe constipation or stomach pain

Naltrexone

Naltrexone blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of opioids such as heroin. If the patient relapses and uses an opioid drug, naltrexone prevents the feeling of getting high. SAMHSA states: “As with all medications used in MAT, naltrexone is to be prescribed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling and participation in social support programs.”

Naltrexone Side Effects

If you have any of the following severe naltrexone side effects , contact your doctor:

  • Allergic reaction such as itching, hives, swelling, chest tightness, trouble breathing
  • Anxiety, confusion, depression, unusual thoughts or behaviors
  • Dark urine or pale stools
  • Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, stomach pain, or yellow skin or eyes
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Irritability
  • Massive increase in energy
  • Reckless behavior
Book an Appointment

Need Help?

Call or Message Us

(614) 710-1496

Open Hours

Monday – Wednesday:

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am – 6:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Sunday – Closed